small wins wednesday

Small Wins Wednesday: Clay class

Published by Lori Pickert on April 30, 2015 at 08:42 AM

Teaching clay class with little brother as his assistant

Teaching with his little brother as his assistant.

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This week’s small win is from Sarah:

My six-year-old son Luca had the idea in early March to teach a pottery class at our home. The motivation behind doing the class was to make money, and the motivation for making money is (naturally) to buy more LEGOs. Luca has a strong interest in money and an entrepreneurial spirit.

He took a lot of steps to get to make this happen. He created and hung up flyers around town, worked on perfecting the process of making the teapots he was going to teach his friends how to make, met with the local art teacher on his own about how to structure an art class, and created (with my help) an invitation on Facebook.

Going out to hang the sign

He'd been putting a lot of energy into this project and we'd been writing down progress and things we needed to remember in our project journal. He was halfway though making a large sign to hang off the front porch the day of the class when we left on a long trip.

I didn’t hear a single word from him about the clay class or pottery for three weeks. I was wondering if he would pick it back up again, especially since there were about 40 (!!!) people coming to my house on the scheduled day to participate. I wondered if by leaving for three weeks we’d broken the momentum for the project.

Exactly one hour after walking through the door of our home he came to me and said, “Mom, can we get out the journal and see where I’m at with the pottery class project?” We read through our notes. He went and pulled out the sign on his own and picked up EXACTLY in the place he left off three weeks before.

The clay class went great. We set up the classroom space just the way Luca envisioned it. As the class started Luca took his seat, then got super shy and didn’t want to say a word. So, my husband stepped in with his kindergarten teacher magic to get the class rolling. Kreg taught for about the first 15 minutes of the class. At some point Luca started to jump in on his own with instructions and by the 30-minute mark Kreg stepped back almost completely and Luca had gotten comfortable enough to do the talking for the remainder of the 60-minute class.

Kreg and I are both working hard on backing waaaay off of Luca and his work. Having a project that culminated in a public event like a class was an interesting mix of figuring out when to step back and when to step forward. I think we did well.

The 15 kids in the class made some terrific pieces and it looked like everyone had a great time (I did!). Luca made enough money to buy the LEGO set he’d been saving for and he even gave his little brother (who was his assistant) a cut of the profits. ;-) I also think Luca might have inspired his dad to start teaching again, which is way cool.

If we'd never found Lori’s book it probably never would have happened!

 

Luca editing a photo he took of his pottery for use in the Facebook invite for his class.

All ready and waiting for friends!

Finished work. Class participants’ ages ranged from 4 to 37.

Maker win: Blythe’s 3D-printed light-up dog collar

Published by Lori Pickert on October 2, 2014 at 09:54 AM

Blythe uses the 3D printer

 

Please enjoy this fantastic win today shared by Nicky Serrano and her daughter Blythe!

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I wanted to share a huge win my 11-year-old daughter Blythe has had at her local Maker’s Guild. I am hoping we avoided most of the pitfalls Lori mentioned in her post What’s Wrong with DIY/Maker Faire/Hacking/Tinkering for Kids — and How We Can Make It Better.

Blythe decided in May that she wanted to make a 3D printed dog collar that lights up automatically at night, and that she wanted to exhibit it at the World Maker Faire (both things completely her idea).

She found her mentors at the Guild, registered herself for the Faire, came up against very many obstacles, made her own web page, printed her own business cards, got accepted to the Faire and finally got a working collar the night before!

She did need help and there were plenty of tears along the way — she had never 3D printed and the soldering was more fiddly than she had predicted, but she learned a ton of things at so many different levels.

At the Faire, she was not in a ‘kid’ section, but right in there with the adults. To top it all, she was interviewed by Make Magazine and she received an Editor’s Choice award and Best in Class.

One of the most popular things about her exhibit was the fact that she displayed all the failed versions of the collar. She is now working on improving the collar to get it to a point where she can sell it, and in the process she is learning all about what it takes to run your own business.

I personally would have preferred her not to have the stress of a deadline, but for her, exhibiting was a crucial part of the project, and I have to say that people were extremely supportive and full of constructive criticism. I’m guessing that exhibiting validates her work and makes the project real.

One of the things I love about our local Maker Space is that they have weekly open nights for people to go in and share their ideas, brainstorm, give advice — so far, my daughter is the only regular kid there, but she’s totally comfortable being dropped off for a few hours.

Here is her promotional video — including video of the dogs wearing her collar at night! — Nicky Serrano

• • •

This is so fantastic and shows what kids can do when they get the opportunities and support they deserve.

To clarify my own thoughts about deadlines, I think it’s not optimal when adults are pushing kids to meet a deadline, but of course when kids set their own goals, it’s self-directed and that’s a whole different matter. Sharing work with an audience is so motivating, as it obviously was for Blythe. Everything about her story is inspiring, but I especially love that she shared the failed versions of her design — really sharing her process and teaching others what she learned.

I know a lot of kids are going to be inspired by Blythe’s work — thank you so much for sharing, Nicky! I can’t wait to hear about her business as it gets going. Let us know if there’s a Kickstarter. :)

See also this great Maker’s Guild article about Blythe!

And a great interview with Blythe: “I like to be able to come up with ideas. I have lots of ideas.”

 

Small Wins Wednesday: The academics of play

Published by Lori Pickert on June 25, 2014 at 08:41 AM

Writing and drawing about the Jacobites.

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On Wednesdays we often share a small win from the forumTwitter, the Facebook page, or (with the writer’s permission) from the mail bag.

This week’s small win is from Kirsten:

Six-year-old R is resistant to anything that vaguely resembles school and has been known to shout “I DON’T WANT TO LEARN ANYTHING!” in response to any scholastic suggestion. So we’ve decided to pull back for now, and completely unschool, subtly strewing interesting stuff, and raising interesting topics at the lunch table, but requiring nothing.

This generally works really well. I know that for a 6-year-old, play is his work, and I’m constantly amazed at what he’s learning from what I perhaps patronisingly call play. But there’s certainly nothing that looks in any way academic. Until last week.

We’d taken him to see a reenactment of an 18th-century Scottish battle, and it really piqued his interest. He’s been playing battles in the garden (always a particular times of day, on a schedule!), making guns (lots of iterations to get the perfect gun), looking at books about the battle and doing some great artwork about it.

I have also been a bit concerned, though, that he’s been watching quite a lot of television, and in particular some programmes that I don’t think have a very good effect on him. So we agreed that he would no longer watch TV at supper time.

On the first evening after we’d reached this agreement, I thought there would be some attempts at renegotiation. But instead, he sat down at the table with a history book, found some passages that particularly interested him, and started copying them out. Apparently these were to be information signs for the museum he was setting up in his bedroom.

We looked on with quite some amazement. This was the boy who wouldn’t do anything that looked like school, spending his suppertime copying out passages from a history book and discussing them with us. Reading, comprehension, handwriting and history all in one, when no requirement is made of him to do anything educational.

To be honest, I know that what he learns from play is just as valuable as what he is learning from sitting down reading and copying from a history book. But the progression from play to research and writing certainly felt like a win! It’s moments like this when I am reminded just what is so great about homeschooling in general, and project-based learning in particular.

• • •

Thank you so much for sharing your small wins — real children doing real work (and parents working hard to become good mentors) are more inspiring than anything. 

Why do we share small wins? Because we put on our attention on what we want to grow. We support each other, celebrate each other’s successes, and we make more of the good stuff!

Have you had a small win this week? Whether it’s related to PBH or not, please share in the comments!

Jacobite museum in bedroom

 

Small Wins Wednesday: Becoming specialists

Published by Lori Pickert on May 13, 2014 at 08:05 PM

Visiting the bird specialist at the Field Museum. The tail on the Sap-Sucker is stiff to stablize it when going up and down trees.

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Every Wednesday we share a small win from the forumTwitter, the Facebook page, or (with the writer’s permission) from the mail bag.

This week’s small win is from akari:

Today my boys 5 and 7 visited the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago as guest visitors, providing the museum with a dead yellow-bellied sapsucker (found after a window accident) as a specimen. The boys were given a tour of the bird division behind the scene by the bird head there and even met the only artist in residence of the museum!

(Older son commented later on, “Oh, I wish I could paint like her…” I found a book that she wrote on how to paint and I now have ordered for it to be on hold at the public library.)

My older son developed a strong interest in birds that seemed to have been triggered by encouraging naturalist grandmas, their most recent Christmas gifts, and seeing their birder lifestyles. The interest seems to have evolved from the boys’ original strong interest in dinosaurs. We used to call the herds of Canada geese various grazing dinosaur names. Also there was an opportunity at my older son’s Saturday Japanese school to make “product drawings” for their chosen stores in February. T made 23 drawings of birds in 3 days for that project and continued to draw continuously for some time.

A great artist neighbor also around the time commissioned my boys to design postcards to send to a daughter in NY to help celebrate her 30th year. I showed T how to scan drawings, clean them up, combine and edit on photoshop. The feedback and the little notes our neighbor sent our boys after each delivery were very encouraging. We will be delivering more postcards.

Towards the end of winter we started to feed birds (started from sunflower heads we grew last year) in our backyard (metra train embankment), and now we have a squirrel-buster feeder, a handmade thistle feeder for goldfinches, a suet feeder, and a hummingbird feeder that we have gradually added. We have counted over 15 different species of birds that now come to our feeders and they have developed interest in photography through it. T has submitted a number of his bird photos to the Ranger Rick photo contest and is eager to observe new migrating birds that visit us. We learned about a website called e-bird, from our new ornithologist friend, that would now allow the boys to report their bird sightings. We might set up a birdbath, nesting boxes, and even plant more flowers that would attract hummingbirds. We have a gardening day scheduled for our apartment community, and the boys and I are discussing the possibility of setting up a bird photo gallery (of visitors to our feeders) in the hallway to share with neighbors during snack time.

This win feels big because of how expansive this project is getting to be. They are becoming specialists! Also, my reasons for taking part in the PBH master class was to learn how to help integrate community input and stimulation to their work. I had always been shy about showing other people what my boys do but I think I am getting over that a bit for their own benefit. I feel that I am finally able to put to practice what I have always believed. My kids belong to the world and not just to our small family.

I am most grateful for the PBH community, a supportive husband, and the timing of this strong interest momentum, as I will soon be more busy with the arrival of a new baby. I am encouraged that the growing independence in our boys is gently making the necessary room for me to build a new relationship with a new baby. :)

After I asked akari if I could share her small win here, she added this addendum:

I wanted to add just one more comment. Especially if you might share my report with more people.

This moment of celebration and inspiration to report back to the PBH community as the mother/observer/helper came to me at this particular moment it seems also because I had been feeling rather discouraged about many other things that had been going on in my family. Not to bore you with details but to illustrate what I mean…

My husband’s health is not particularly good and we are currently having trouble straightening out the most basics of health insurance dealings with BCBS. If my husband cannot work any more, I will have to be out working which will put a fast stop to our homeschooling endeavors. We are renovating a new apartment unit where my mother is scheduled to stay prior to and when the baby arrives. The schedule is quite delayed and people are not living up to their promises. My feet swell now and they hurt. I only have a month left where the baby is in a neat little bundle within me. I have a beloved kitty dying with a kidney disease. He had always been with me laboring through every home birth…

When I read positive and happy comment that people make, I tend to get a fixed image of that person “yay”-ing and smiling all the time. But if I stop and think about it I know that is probably not the case. I know that just like all the challenges that I am facing, everyone else has their own challenges. Living is tough sometimes and for that we want to and need to celebrate all that we can say “Yay!!” about. So for the time being and for this particular project I’ve been working on with my kids, “Yay!”

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Yay! Thank you so much for sharing your small win — real people doing real work are more inspiring than anything. 

Why do we share small wins? Because we put on our attention on what we want to grow. We support each other, celebrate each other’s successes, and we make more of the good stuff!

Have you had a small win this week? Whether it’s related to PBH or not, please share in the comments!

More birds he recognized. And they got to touch them!

Filling the bird feeders.

T making a thistle seed bird feeder, after we saw a goldfinch.

T drew 26 birds in three days.

Custom postcard made in Photoshop.

 

Small Wins Wednesday: The power of documenting

Published by Lori Pickert on May 6, 2014 at 12:16 PM

Lining up the Europa life forms, facing them towards the camera for a picture.

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Every Wednesday we share a small win from the forumTwitter, the Facebook page, or (with the writer’s permission) from the mail bag.

This week’s small win is from Erin (mckittre in the forum):

Documentation is one of my weak points.

This morning, after some read-aloud from his Space Encyclopedia, my son started telling a story about a rover discovering life on Europa.

He built a lego rover, then told me that it discovered 13 kinds of life and he was going to build them out of legos. So I grabbed my notebook, turned a page, numbered it 1-13, and asked him to tell me about them.

Later, his dad came in and noticed the line of lego creations, so my son excitedly grabbed the notebook and asked dad to read about them. Then grandma came in and he did the same. (I should have used neater handwriting.)

I think my documentation encouraged him to actually finish all 13, and gave him a way to share that jogged his memory about what he’d created, and gave it some more weight and importance.

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Erin blogs at Ground Truth Trekking and also tweets. Thank you so much for sharing your small win!

See these PBH posts about journaling and documenting:

Project Journal — Parent’s

Inside My Project Journal

Why do we share small wins? Because we put on our attention on what we want to grow. We support each other, celebrate each other’s successes, and we make more of the good stuff!

Have you had a small win this week? Whether it’s related to PBH or not, please share in the comments!

Jupiter moon rover, nicknamed “Speed Rover,” with drill to drill through Europa’s ice.

 

Little sister also wants to play. She made a plane with guns.

 

Europa’s life displayed — in the order they evolved in.

 

My ugly notebook page with the names and characteristics of all the critters. Next time I need more room to write about who eats who.

 

New lego rover explores extra-solar planet with a similar composition to Neptune — checking the reference.

 

The solar system inspires a drawing in a non-drawing kid.

Small Wins Wednesday: Mentoring a mentor

Published by Lori Pickert on April 30, 2014 at 07:41 AM

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Every Wednesday we share a small win from the forumTwitter, the Facebook page, or (with the writer’s permission) from the mail bag.

This week’s small win is from Kerry:

My 6 year old had been playing birthday party for each of her stuffed animals and dolls for weeks. She would cut up decorations, write invitations and wrap “presents” for the guest of honor. She’d make a cake in her play kitchen and we’d sing “Happy Birthday.”
 
One day she decided she wanted to plan a real party, with balloons, and a piñata full of candy, and guests, and everything. She’d never made a piñata before, so we watched some videos on You-tube, made a list, and headed to the store for supplies.
 
Just as she started making the paper-maché paste, back at home, her big sister stepped in to help. As I sat back, happy to not be assisting any longer, snapping pictures to document, I noticed that big sister was slowly taking over the project. She had opinions on everything from which paste recipe to use, to how to close up the piñata after filling it. All decisions the 6-year-old had already made. I tried suggesting she start her own paper-maché project, but she wasn’t interested. And really, the 6yo did need help covering the huge balloon with all the little strips of paper and, with her sister’s help, they were able to quickly whip up more paste when they unexpectedly ran out. She needed her help, and they were having a lot of fun.
 
I didn’t want to discourage either of them, but I didn’t want my youngest daughter to lose ownership of the project either. So, I went to Lori and the forum for help.
 
Lori had some great ideas, of course, and I have spent some time talking with my daughter about helping me mentor her younger siblings. I’ve told her what a great example she is setting while she works on her own projects. And I have tried to make my own learning visible, talking about what I’m working on to improve myself, so that she becomes more aware of her own actions and how they might be improved.
 
Last week, the 13-year-old, along with the help of her cousin and sister, organized a camp for her younger siblings and cousins. They cleared a space in the bit of woods edging our yard, set up the tent, hung a tire swing, built a pallet table for meals, shopped for groceries, collected field guides, made a hilarious welcome/rules of camp video to show to the campers before heading out, and planned activities and games. I was so impressed with her ability to keep everyone doing what they needed to be doing, and delegating work, without dictating or being overly “bossy.” Everyone had a great time and, while they were cleaning up the site at the end of camp, my 6-year-old came to me, with a sad face, and said she didn’t want camp to be over. Planning has already begun for the next camp and the campers all signed up right away.
 
As I wrote in the forum last week, I have loved watching my daughter’s “bossiness” develop into thoughtful, trusted leadership.
 
It’s amazing when I think back to the little girl at 3 ordering her cousins and little sister around, getting angry and frustrated at their reactions. I can still see the red face and foot stomp at the bottom of the slide as she yelled that they were doing it (the obstacle course) wrong. And, to now see them come to her with their ideas looking for someone willing to put it all together, to do the planning and organizing. Or to see her present her plans to an attentive group, to see her get them excited about her plans, and to see her welcome, or at least consider, others’ ideas and input.
 
It’s not always roses, of course, but she really is becoming a brilliant leader, and as someone who prefers to do my own thing, and not mess with trying to lead others, in general, I find it awe inspiring.

• • •

Kerry blogs at 6 Berries and also tweets. Thank you so much for sharing your small win!

Why do we share small wins? Because we put on our attention on what we want to grow. We support each other, celebrate each other’s successes, and we make more of the good stuff!

Have you had a small win this week? Whether it’s related to PBH or not, please share in the comments!

 

Small Wins Wednesday: Great kid mentors

Published by Lori Pickert on April 23, 2014 at 07:58 AM

Turning the play kitchen into a workbench with Grandpa Dave

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Every Wednesday we share a small win from the forumTwitter, the Facebook page, or (with the writer’s permission) from the mail bag.

Carrie shared a great win on her blog about her young son’s experience being treated seriously and respectfully at the hardware store:

“I’n a go get my TOOLS!” And he was off at a run again, this time back up the street.

Ryan grinned when he saw Hawk. “You’re back.” He placed the screwdriver and hammer on the counter. “You still want these?”

“Yup.” Hawk handed over the coins. “I bring-ed my money.”

“Tell you what, Hawk.” Ryan rang up the purchase. “I’m going to give you the young builder’s discount. When I was a kid, I wanted real tools too. And I saved up for them too. I bet you’re going to go on and build great things.”  He handed the tools to Hawk. “Really great things.”

“Thanks.” Hawk tucked his new tools into his shopping bag. “I’m a worker.”

“You are,” Ryan said.  ”No doubt.”

Read the whole inspirational post, with more examples of greating mentoring, here: Young Builder’s Discount.

• • •

Why do we share small wins? Because we put on our attention on what we want to grow. We support each other, celebrate each other’s successes, and we make more of the good stuff!

Have you had a small win this week? Whether it’s related to PBH or not, please share in the comments!

 

Alma working

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Every Wednesday we share a small win from the forumTwitter, the Facebook page, or (with the writer’s permission) from the mail bag.

 

Alma has been working on a baking project for several months.

Recently we had a dilemma. She would love to bake every day. But it costs money. And if we eat it all we would grow very fat. She didn’t feel confident enough to sell to strangers, and she didn’t want to talk about prices to people. Baking once a week wasn’t enough for her. I suggested baking very small things, but that doesn't work for every recipe.

She likes to bring things to family for parties, as a gift. But she doesn't want to think about how much money people should pay, and she’s very concerned that they are satisfied with the product. She has made some cakes for my friends, and they were happy with them, but Alma almost couldn't sleep because it made her very anxious.

After brainstorming with friends in the PBH forum, we decided that she would bake for charity, and for friends and family. We set a budget apart for it, and friends/family can pay what they think is fair. The same for gatherings like homeschool outings. This way she can get used to baking for others and working with her insecurity about what people think of it.

This has led to a series of great wins…

She baked for friends and the woman was so astonished by her cookies that she asked for baking lessons. Alma will bake at her house on Saturday, a basic cake for starters. Our friend will pay for the ingredients and Alma will teach her how to bake. Her husband has a sweet tooth so he was very happy about this arrangement. They are both professional artists and in return will teach her about sculpting and printmaking. Yay!

We instituted her budget and immediately she had a plan — she wanted to make her own fondant. It was an awful mess and the kitchen smelled like you were inside a marshmallow, but she went through with it. Now she has three pounds of pink fondant. She cleaned the kitchen and she is so proud. She wants to bake pink decorated small cakes for her visit to the Toon Hermanshuis on Friday.

Toon Hermanshuis is a place where people with cancer can meet and talk. Alma baked for them as a volunteer. They loved it. She made it a commitment to bake a cake every week. She was very proud of her work. And she went on her bike, by herself, with a big box full of lemon cake through the rain. I didn’t have to drive her — she said she is not made of sugar and it is her project. And it is a five-mile ride. She came back wet and proud and she made me proud too. — Josh

 

Why do we share small wins? Because we put on our attention on what we want to grow. We support each other, celebrate each other’s successes, and we make more of the good stuff!

Have you had a small win this week? Whether it’s related to PBH or not, please share in the comments!

A cake for a friend

Contributing to a bookstore event

Cake for her aunt

Making fondant

Fondant dragon

Cake for the cat club

Cake for Toon Hermanshuis

This is a pic of my daughter on the “tiny sewist program”. She wanted to do a princess dress for her friend’s birthday. Of course, I freaked initially. Then, we discussed the steps (choosing fabric, making patterns, cutting, etc.) and I wrote them on a board… — M, in the forum

• • •

Every Wednesday we share a small win from the forumTwitter, the Facebook page, or (with the writer’s permission) from the mail bag.

 

My son (7) announced this morning he wanted to sew.

We saw a book at the library Sewing for Children (and I just saw a recommendation for it on the sewing thread — I think it is a nice intro to sewing, lots of felt, easy projects) and the kids have been looking through it for a while.

We have done some sewing in the past, and I have not been able to not take over. So I was a bit nervous. Luckily I have spend a great deal of time catching up on the threads here last night. ;-)

The kids each picked a project and started, both projects had lots of buttons and they started sewing it on haphazardly and I just couldn’t help myself given them a button sewing lesson and getting them to do a practice run on a scrap piece of felt. After that my son lost interest and I thought I blew it. And I felt so bad, I could kick myself for falling in this trap again.

We went to visit friends, while driving I reflected why I react in this way. Part of the ‘problem’ is that all the materials, tools, etc., are my sewing stuff. They do not have any sewing materials in their project cupboard.

On our way back we stopped at our little local sewing shop. They chose a few colorful felt pieces, needles and embroidery thread, and a plastic box to keep the thread and scissors in. They were so excited; they ran to our workspace and started working.

My son used his practice scrap and turned it into a little bag, sewing the seams all by himself. He then proceeded in hand sewing little bags for his sister and me. I was so impressed. He glowed and made each of us a pincushion as well, stuffing and hand sewing it with the utmost patience. He asked if he could make each of us a little felt needle case tomorrow (ever the practical one ;-).

My daughter, who just turned five, has her heart set on a mobile phone felt soft toy. I have helped her holding materials, threading the needle, tying knots, etc., if asked. I haven’t taken over — I have managed to be there to move her project along without her getting too frustrated or feeling it is too hard. And she is so happy and proud. She is still working on her project and tomorrow I am going to hang back more, now that she has practice with some of the skills.

We worked like this for over 2 hours and when I went downstairs to start dinner they both brought their work with them and sat at the table working. I hope I have turned a corner. I find it hard to let go if there is a definite skill or sequence involved; I want to teach them the basics. All with best intent of course: helping them to succeed. Yet the joy and pride they had this afternoon was so wonderful for me to witness. — L.

 

Why do we share small wins? Because we put on our attention on what we want to grow. We support each other, celebrate each other’s successes, and we make more of the good stuff!

Have you had a small win this week? Whether it’s related to PBH or not, please share in the comments!

F sewing a stuffed solar system. — Dawn

F making cat ears. — Dawn

Small Wins Wednesday: Authentic writing

Published by Lori Pickert on March 12, 2014 at 07:37 AM

Kit (age 3) is now plowing through the old Birds & Blooms magazines so she can figure out what to plant in the garden. #butterflyproject #pbh

She is insisting on writing all of the flower names herself. — Sarah

• • •

Every Wednesday we share a small win from the forumTwitter, the Facebook page, or (with the writer’s permission) from the mail bag.

 

My 10 yr old has been between projects since his football project waned, possibly as a result of the season ending. A couple of weeks ago he was reading a magazine article on the seven wonders of the ancient world when he became inspired by the information about the creator of this list. He began thinking about making a list of his own. Great, I thought — until he said he would make a list of the top Mario games on his blog.

How did we get from the ancient world to Mario video games? My eye began to twitch as it always does when video games come up during project time, but I know enough now to not say anything and not to jump to the conclusion that he’s just finding excuses to play games during project time.

He wrote his top 10 list and then decided, after getting his feet wet, he’d make another top 10 for the best galaxies in Mario Galaxy. He wrote this list over the course of three days. He researched other lists, watched videos of top 10s, and really considerd the best galaxies for his list and why they should make the top ten and their individual placement. By the time he was done, he had created a thoughtful and entertaining piece of writing that was also quite lengthy I might add (at least as long as any school report would be required to be and far more interesting to read). He had catchy openings and varied sentence structure and, although it wasn’t very academic in topic, it was authentic and I could see a budding talent for writing.

Never could he or would he write anything so amazing on any topic I told him he must write on. He might squeeze out a few boring sentences to compliment a topic he deemed boring, but it wouldn’t be anything close to this blog post on Mario. Even better, he came to me with his “to do” list one day so he wouldn’t forget what he needed to do the next day! Now he’s creating Mario pixel art. He’s using graph paper for his designs and then building them in Minecraft. He’s planning a post on that as well.

PBH can be hard, but I’m so glad I’ve stuck with it through all the struggles and doubts and difficult times. Both my boys have produced some amazing stuff in the last year, but I’ve had to see it with my fresh new PBH glasses. My old traditional school glasses would never have seen the value in all this work or even let it proceed. We would have missed out on so much!Christi

 

Why do we share small wins? Because we put on our attention on what we want to grow. We support each other, celebrate each other’s successes, and we make more of the good stuff!

Have you had a small win this week? Whether it’s related to PBH or not, please share in the comments!

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