Raising entrepreneurs: Making things happen

Published by Lori Pickert on December 20, 2011 at 04:56 PM

Ideas are one thing and what happens is another.    — John Cage

An entrepreneur isn’t just on fire with an idea; (s)he is able to do what needs to be done to make it really happen.

Inspiration is not enough. Between the idea and the execution is a lot of hard work. How do children learn how to make their ideas happen? How do they learn how to forge ahead when things don’t come easily?

Talent and ability is not enough. Calvin Coolidge said, “Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful people with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan ‘press on’ has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race.”

Being in charge of your own business — and your own life — is less scary when you have a lot of experience solving problems, finding collaborators, and making things work.

One of the great lessons of project work is that big ideas break down into a lot of small tasks, and when you complete all those tasks, you eventually get to see your big idea in action. That simple experience of doing what’s necessary to make things happen — over and over again — teaches an important lesson of building a company or a life: you have to get started, and you have to do what’s necessary, if you want to see your ideas come to fruition.

Children whose learning is centered around following directions and meeting the requirements set forth by adults may be well prepared to be employees. But will they be prepared to be in charge of their own business and their own life? Will they know how to make their own ideas happen?

Creativity is, quite simply, a genuine interest combined with initiative. — Scott Belsky, Making Ideas Happen

 

2 comments

Comment by Dawn Suzette on December 20, 2011 at 08:38 PM

Love this part:

"One of the great lessons of project work is that big ideas break down into a lot of small tasks, and when you complete all those tasks, you eventually get to see your big idea in action."

We need to work harder on getting those ideas broken down to managable tasks. Sometimes the ideas are so big it is hard to see how they can be broken down working within the skill level of the kids. Any help here?
When we do get it right I love to see the eyes light up at the end result.

Comment by Tana on December 22, 2011 at 06:17 PM

About breaking big, exciting ideas into accomplishable tasks: the only thing I've found to work (sometimes) for me is picking one tiny thing at a time. It has to be simple, something I can do in one step. (Make one phone call, buy a pen, get books from the library, find the bus schedule - we're talking mini-tasks.) But even still, I have a hard time keeping up the momentum and initative to work toward the end goal. I wonder how many kids can do that and still maintain an interest in working toward the big idea. I imagine you learn to do it by doing it over and over.

I love this corner of the internet so much. I am inspired right now to pick an idea of my own and just start working on it, one small task at a time. I love the connections between building a business and building a life.

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